Mental Health Problems

Types of Mental Health Problems 

Here you will find a variety of Mental Health Problems and the symptoms that are likely to relate to the problem. Please note this is for information only and is not a symptom checker. If you believe you have a Mental Health Problem, please speak with your GP in the first instance. Not all Mental Health Problems have been recorded here. 

Depression

Depression is common and can be a serious mental illness. Depression negatively affects how we feel, the way we think and the way we act. Essentially depression is low mood that lasts a long time and effects our everyday activities and life.

There are different types of depression; Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), Dysthymia, Prenatal depression and Post-Natal Depression.

Symptoms include but are not limited to;

How you might feel

  • down, upset or tearful
  • restless, agitated or irritable
  • guilty, worthless and down on yourself
  • empty and numb
  • isolated and unable to relate to other people
  • finding no pleasure in life or things you usually enjoy
  • a sense of unreality
  • no self-confidence or self-esteem
  • hopeless and despairing
  • suicidal.

How you might behave

  • avoiding social events and activities you usually enjoy
  • self-harming or suicidal behaviour
  • difficulty speaking, thinking clearly or making decisions
  • losing interest in sex
  • difficulty remembering or concentrating on things
  • using more tobacco, alcohol or other drugs than usual
  • difficulty sleeping, or sleeping too much
  • feeling tired all the time
  • no appetite and losing weight, or eating too much and gaining weight
  • physical aches and pains with no obvious physical cause
  • moving very slowly, or being restless and agitated.

Symptoms from Mind and NHS.

 

 

 

 

Anxiety 

Anxiety is a natural feeling that we all feel sometime in our lives, however, some people can experience anxiety for a long period of time and can be severe. Anxiety can negatively affect our daily activities and life. 

Anxiety is a feeling of unease which could be worry or fear; this can be mild or severe. 

Symptoms include but are not limited to;

Effects of anxiety on your mind.

These can include:

  • feeling tense, nervous or unable to relax
  • having a sense of dread, or fearing the worst
  • feeling like the world is speeding up or slowing down
  • feeling like other people can see you're anxious and are looking at you
  • feeling like you can't stop worrying, or that bad things will happen if you stop worrying
  • worrying about anxiety itself, for example worrying about when panic attacks might happen
  • wanting lots of reassurance from other people or worrying that people are angry or upset with you
  • worrying that you're losing touch with reality
  • low mood and depression
  • rumination – thinking a lot about bad experiences, or thinking over a situation again and again
  • depersonalisation – a type of dissociation where you feel disconnected from your mind or body, or like you are a character that you are watching in a film
  • derealisation – another type of dissociation where you feel disconnected from the world around you, or like the world isn't real

Effects of anxiety on your body.

These can include:

  • a churning feeling in your stomach
  • feeling light-headed or dizzy
  • pins and needles
  • feeling restless or unable to sit still
  • headaches, backache or other aches and pains
  • faster breathing
  • a fast, thumping or irregular heartbeat
  • sweating or hot flushes
  • sleep problems
  • grinding your teeth, especially at night
  • nausea (feeling sick)
  • needing the toilet more or less often
  • changes in your sex drive
  • having panic attacks

Symptoms from Mind and NHS. 

 

 

Bipolar Disorder (BPD)

Bipolar disorder is a mental health condition that affects our moods, which can swing from 1 extreme to another. It used to be known as manic depression.

People with Bipolar disorder will have episodes of depression and mania. 

Depression: low mood and feeling lethargic

Mania: High mood and feeling very energetic

Depression:

During a period of depression, your symptoms may include:

  • feeling sad, hopeless or irritable most of the time
  • lacking energy
  • difficulty concentrating and remembering things
  • loss of interest in everyday activities
  • feelings of emptiness or worthlessness
  • feelings of guilt and despair
  • feeling pessimistic about everything
  • self-doubt
  • being delusional, having hallucinations and disturbed or illogical thinking
  • lack of appetite
  • difficulty sleeping
  • waking up early
  • suicidal thoughts

Mania

The manic phase of bipolar disorder may include:

  • feeling very happy, elated or overjoyed
  • talking very quickly
  • feeling full of energy
  • feeling self-important
  • feeling full of great new ideas and having important plans
  • being easily distracted
  • being easily irritated or agitated
  • being delusional, having hallucinations and disturbed or illogical thinking
  • not feeling like sleeping
  • not eating
  • doing things that often have disastrous consequences – such as spending large sums of money on expensive and sometimes unaffordable items
  • making decisions or saying things that are out of character and that others see as being risky or harmful

Symptoms from Mind and NHS.

 

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder is an anxiety disorder that is caused by very stressful, traumatic, frightening or distressing events. 

Someone with PTSD often relives the traumatic event through nightmares and flashbacks, we may experience feelings of isolation, guilt and negative moods. 

We may also have problems sleeping and find concentrating difficult.

These symptoms are often severe and persistent enough to have a significant impact on the person's day-to-day life.

Any situation that a person finds traumatic can cause PTSD.

These can include:

  • serious road accidents
  • violent personal assaults, such as sexual assault, mugging or robbery
  • serious health problems
  • childbirth experiences

PTSD can develop immediately after someone experiences a disturbing event, or it can occur weeks, months or even years later.

PTSD is estimated to affect about 1 in every 3 people who have a traumatic experience, but it's not clear exactly why some people develop the condition and others do not

Symptoms are from Mind and NHS